Date of Original Version

1-24-2005

Type

Article

Abstract or Description

By deWnition, dynamic decision making dictates that multiple and interrelated decisions be made in a continuously changing environment. Such decision making is diYcult and often taxes individuals’ cognitive resources. Here I investigated ways in which to support decision making in these environments. I evaluated three forms of decision support: outcome feedback, cognitive feedback, and feedforward that incorporated (to varying degrees) common features of learning theories associated with dynamic tasks. Participants in a laboratory experiment performed a real-time, dynamic decision-making task while receiving one of the diVerent types of decision support. During the Wrst 2 days, individuals received one type of decision support, but on the third day they performed the task without this support. Participants who received feedforward improved their performance considerably and continued to exhibit improved performance even after discontinuation of the decision support on the third day. Neither outcome feedback nor cognitive feedback resulted in improved performance. More research is necessary to conclusively identify the best forms of dynamic decisionmaking support and their durability when transferred to new tasks.

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