Date of Original Version

10-2014

Type

Conference Proceeding

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Post-Editing Technology and Practice (ATMA)

First Page

73

Last Page

84

Abstract or Description

The pause to word ratio, the number of pauses per word in a post-edited MT segment, is an indicator of cognitive effort in post-editing (Lacruz and Shreve, 2014). We investigate how low the pause threshold can reasonably be taken, and we propose that 300 ms is a good choice, as pioneered by Schilperoord (1996). We then seek to identify a good measure of the cognitive demand imposed by MT output on the post-editor, as opposed to the cognitive effort actually exerted by the post-editor during post-editing. Measuring cognitive demand is closely related to measuring MT utility, the MT quality as perceived by the post-editor. HTER, an extrinsic edit to word ratio that does not necessarily correspond to actual edits per word performed by the post-editor, is a well-established measure of MT quality, but it does not comprehensively capture cognitive demand (Koponen, 2012). We investigate intrinsic measures of MT quality, and so of cognitive demand, through edited-error to word metrics. We find that the transfer-error to word ratio predicts cognitive effort better than mechanical-error to word ratio (Koby and Champe, 2013). We identify specific categories of cognitively challenging MT errors whose error to word ratios correlate well with cognitive effort.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Published In

Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Post-Editing Technology and Practice (ATMA), 73-84.