Date of Original Version

4-2013

Type

Thesis

Rights Management

All Rights Reserved

Abstract or Description

This thesis explores the history of two efforts during the past half-century to enhance parental input in public schooling: the Community Control movement in Ocean Hill-Brownsville in 1968 and the formation of Parent Nation in Pittsburgh Public Schools in 2012-2013. I use a combination of historical and field research methods (observations, interviews) to explore the two case studies. The events leading to the Ocean Hill-Brownsville Teachers Strike of 1968 exemplified high parental involvement in school decision making, in a context of sharp political and racial conflict. The formation of Parent Nation in Pittsburgh occurred in a very different political and cultural environment and, crucially, one in which the role of charter schools has fundamentally transformed modern educational discourse. While the Ocean Hill-Brownsville and Pittsburgh stories differ greatly, both are valuable for demonstrating the complexities inherent in all efforts, past and present, to significantly enlarge parents’ voice in educational decision making.

Comments

Advisor: Steven Schlossman

Department of History

Embargo Date

2013

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