Date of Original Version

2004

Type

Conference Proceeding

Rights Management

Copyright © 2004 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers, or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., fax +1 (212) 869-0481, or permissions@acm.org. © ACM, 2004. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in the Proceedings of the 5th conference on Designing interactive systems: processes, practices, methods, and techniques {1-58113-787-7 (2004)} http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1013115.1013129

Abstract or Description

Privacy is a difficult design issue that is becoming increasingly important as we push into ubiquitous computing environments. While there is a fair amount of theoretical work on designing for privacy, there are few practical methods for helping designers create applications that provide end-users with a reasonable level of privacy protection that is commensurate with the domain, with the community of users, and with the risks and benefits to all stakeholders in the intended system. Towards this end, we propose privacy risk models as a general method for refining privacy from an abstract concept into concrete issues for specific applications and prioritizing those issues. In this paper, we introduce a privacy risk model we have developed specifically for ubiquitous computing, and outline two case studies describing our use of this privacy risk model in the design of two ubiquitous computing applications.

Comments

Copyright © 2004 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers, or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., fax +1 (212) 869-0481, or permissions@acm.org. © ACM, 2004. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in the Proceedings of the 5th conference on Designing interactive systems: processes, practices, methods, and techniques {1-58113-787-7 (2004)} http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1013115.1013129

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