Date of Original Version

2004

Type

Conference Proceeding

Rights Management

© ACM, (2004). This is the author’s version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in the Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work {1-58113-810-5 (2004)}http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1031607.1031712

Abstract or Description

As new communications media foster international collaborations, we would be remiss in overlooking cultural differences when assessing them. In this study, 24 pairs in three cultural groupings—American-American (AA), Chinese-Chinese (CC) and American-Chinese (AC) –worked on two decision-making tasks, one face-to-face and the other via IM. Drawing upon prior research, we predicted differences in conversational efficiency, conversational content, interaction quality, persuasion, and performance. The quantitative results combined with conversation analysis suggest that the groups viewed the task differently—AA pairs as an exercise in situation-specific compromise; CC as consensus-reaching. Cultural differences were reduced but not eliminated in the IM condition.

Comments

© ACM, (2004). This is the author’s version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in the Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work {1-58113-810-5 (2004)}http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1031607.1031712

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