Date of Original Version

2003

Type

Conference Proceeding

Rights Management

©2003 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

Abstract or Description

Today’s complex appliances are plagued by difficultto- use interfaces. In many cases, consumers use only a few of the many features on their appliances because the more complex features are hidden by confusing interfaces. This problem can only get worse as appliances get smarter, become more complex, and are subject to more demands by their users. This paper presents two studies that compare the accuracy and speed of real users controlling two common appliances, a stereo and a telephone/answering machine, using two different interaction techniques. Our studies found that people using an appliance interface presented on a handheld computer performed the same set of tasks in half the time while making half the errors as compared to using the appliance’s built-in control panel. These studies are motivating us to build a generic remote appliance control system that we call the personal universal controller.

Comments

©2003 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

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