Date of Award

Spring 5-2014

Embargo Period

2-12-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Advisor(s)

Gabriela Hug

Abstract

A two-level optimal coordination control approach for energy storage and conventional generation consisting of advanced frequency control and stochastic optimal dispatch is proposed to deal with the real power balancing control problem introduced by variable renewable energy sources (RESs) in power systems. In the proposed approach, the power and energy constraints on energy storage are taken into account in addition to the traditional power system operational constraints such as generator output limits and power network constraints. The advanced frequency control level which is based on the robust control theory and the decentralized static output feedback design is responsibl e for the system frequency stabilization and restoration, whereas the stochastic optimal dispatch level which is based on the concept of stochastic model predictive control (SMPC) determines the optimal dispatch of generation resources and energy storage under uncertainties introduced by RESs as well as demand. In the advanced frequency control level, low-order decentralized robust frequency controllers for energy storage and conventional generation are simultaneously designed based on a state-space structure-preserving model of the power system and the optimal controller gains are solved via an improved linear matrix inequality algorithm. In the stochastic optimal dispatch level, various optimization decomposition techniques including both primal and dual decompositions together with two different decomposition schemes (i.e. scenario-based decomposition and temporal-based decomposition) are extensively investigated in terms of convergence speed due to the resulting large-scale and computationally demanding SMPC optimization problem. A two-stage mixed decomposition method is conceived to achieve the maximum speedup of the SMPC optimization solution process. The underlying control design philosophy across the entire work is the so-called time-scale matching principle, i.e. the conventional generators are mainly responsible to balance the low frequency components of the power variations whereas the energy storage devices because of their fast response capability are employed to alleviate the relatively high frequency components. The performance of the proposed approach is tested and evaluated by numerical simulations on both the WECC 9-bus system and the IEEE New England 39-bus system.

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