Date of Original Version

5-2009

Type

Article

Abstract or Description

Participants lifted a canister by its handle while balancing a ball on the lid. Experiment 1 allowed object rotation prior to lifting. A lifting comfort zone was measured by the variability in object orientation at lift; its size depended on the object mass and required task precision. The amount of pre-lift rotation correlated with the resulting change in lifting capability, as measured for different object orientations. Experiment 2 required direct grasping, without preparatory rotation. Task completion time and success rate decreased, and initial object orientation affected pre-lift time. Results suggest that lifting from the comfort zone produces more robust performance at a cost of slower completion; moreover, physical rotation could be replaced by mental planning when direct grasping is enforced.

DOI

10.1080/00222890903269195

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